Reflections of week 1

Concluding all the discussions and reflections our group engaged in during the first topic on online participation and digital literacies would result in a short novel. Therefore, I have decided to only reflect upon the categorization of individuals in visitors/residents, or even natives/immigrants. In our group we discussed and reflected that labeling is in this case quite difficult, as individuals might not perceive themselves as falling into a category. But the main difficulty is that individuals have a tendency to, as White and Le Cornu (2011) propose, move from and between resident to visitor, on a continuum, as shown in Figure 1.

Figure 1. Visitor – Resident continuum (White & Le Cornu, 2011).

This continuum, where individuals slide from one end to the other makes labelling difficult, and maybe even unnecessary. And do we actually need labels, or categories such as these? For whom are they beneficial? This is also interesting from a personal point of view. How would I label myself, as I feel that I fit in both categories, or labels? For instance, I feel that I have an online presence (even if I have started to cut down on these), even if I log off, but I still do much of my thinking off-line, and feel as if online tools as just that, tools for accomplishing a task. So for some parts, I’m leaning towards a resident, while other parts of me feel like a visitor. But do I/we actually need to label myself/ourselves? And what is the point?

References:

White, D.S. and Le Cornu, A., 2011. Visitors and Residents: A new typology for online engagement. First monday, 16(9).

My thoughts on digital – less is more

I’m a digital visitor, with early experience of the use of digital tools. My first memory of a computer was when I visited a friends fathers workplace at Helsinki University, and we got to see the computer they had there. This was maybe 1985(ish), when I was 6(ish). Later on as computers became more common, I also got my own stationary, in ca 1990-91, as I remember that one of the first games I had was Ski or Die, which came out in 1990. From thereon I have been what some people call early adopters, as I have started using different technological advances at quite an early stage, from mobile phones (Nokia 2110), smartphones (iPhone 1) and tablets (iPad 1) to social media (IRC) and wearables (fitbit). So the journey early on was head on. But since about 4 years ago this changed. I started to contemplate on why I do this, and what is the point. So I decided to go cold turkey.

My phone is now a “dumb”phone without any possibilities to use apps or smart functions, I have limited social media presence, and I try and use modern tech only when it actually is needed. I’m not at all against digital development, quite the contrary. Some tech innovations are wonderful and even save lives, but for me, the line between normal use and too much is too easy to cross, so I have decide to live with less tech, and for me, it has done wonders. I, as also others that limit social media, feel as if I’m more present at home and at work, and feel less stressed (Hunt et al., 2018). And knowing I’m unaware of what everybody does is quite nice (no fomo), even if my social life is a bit limited, cause let’s face it, who calls anymore…

So far the ONL journey has been rather confusing. I find that everything is very unclear, and even feel that there is a bit of information overload. But from chaos might rise order. At least I hope so.

References:

Hunt, M. G., Marx, R., Lipson, C., & Young, J. (2018). No more FOMO: Limiting social media decreases loneliness and depression. Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, 37(10), 751-768.